Stendrode, the electrical brain stimulator that can help epileptics

The device could also be used to develop less invasive treatments for conditions such as depression
Source: El Periódico / EFE

Melbourne – Tuesday, 12/4/2018
Researchers in Australia developed a tiny device that generates electrical stimuli in the brain and that could contribute to the treatment of epilepsy and Parkinson’s disease, academic sources reported today.

The device, called Stendrode, is four millimeters in diameter and is implanted without the need for invasive surgery – through a vein in the neck – in a blood vessel near the motor areas of the brain to emit localized stimuli.

“We have created a two-way digital communication device by adding the ability to talk to the brain through electrical stimulation,” lead research leader Nick Opie said in a statement from the University of Melbourne.

This technology, which is based on previous applications on the use of the Stentrode to combat paralysis, opens the door to treatments for diseases such as epilepsy and Parkinson’s, which require complex open-brain operations.

“In an application, the Stentrode can be used as a tool to record the onset of an epileptic seizure and provide the stimulation to prevent it,” Opie explained.

The device could also be used to develop less invasive treatments for conditions such as depression and obsessive-compulsive disorders, the statement added.

The research, which involved several medical and academic institutions and a company in Melbourne, included testing with this device in a sheep.

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